Don’t Make This Mistake When Transferring a Used Car Title at the DMV

Learn from Nancy’s mistake of not properly reading the used car title when going to transfer it to her name at the DMV.

Transcript:

Just going to New Jersey Motor Vehicles can be a nightmare, but I, I doubled down and caused this problem myself. Sheer stupidity. Hi, I’m Nancy at Kneble’s Auto Service Center. Something as simple as changing a title into my name, after buying a used vehicle, turned into a fiasco, which was kindly pointed out to me, it isn’t the first time I did this. Thanks, Fred. I really didn’t need to know that. Save yourself from this problem. The seller filled out her name on the back portion of the title, and I signed my name on the back as the buyer. No problem. I’m still in the clear.

Here’s where the error happened. On the back of the title, in addition to the seller’s name and address and the buyer’s name and address, it asks for the odometer reading. Now I put the mileage in the space, and to my haste, I checked off the box below that states I hereby certify, to the best of my knowledge, the odometer. Bingo. That’s all I read. I never continued reading the sentence where it goes on to say the odometer has exceeded its mechanical limit and the reading started to zero. Really? I couldn’t have finished reading? I was in such a rush only for the cashier at Motor Vehicles to kindly point this error out to me. She said being this is a title, is a legal document, and you cannot alter it. The only way to correct my stupidity now has the person who sold me the car sign a title correction form and have it notarized, which can cost money.

I can’t believe I did this. Now, thank God my seller was local, but can you imagine if you had to go track your seller down in another state? My seller was very kind, and she quickly filled out the form and got it notarized at our local back. It truly could have been so much more aggravating and stressful, and who wants that? Don’t shoot from the hip, like I’m told I do. Spend time reading before you sign something, especially if it’s a legal document. Prevent problems before they occur.

Thank you for watching, and check out a new video every Wednesday at 12:30 P.M where we discuss a different topic. Thank you.